How to Keep Coffee Safe

How to Keep Coffee Safe

To make the perfect cup of coffee, start with high-quality beans that are properly stored to retain freshness and flavor. The sections that follow detail the best ways for keeping coffee beans.

Keep beans cool and sealed

Air, moisture, heat, and light are your beans’ worst enemies.

To keep your beans’ fresh roasted flavor as long as possible, store them at room temperature in an opaque, airtight container. Coffee beans can be lovely, but avoid clear canisters, which enable light to interfere with the flavor of your coffee.

Keep your beans in a cold, dark place. A cabinet near the oven is frequently overheated, as is a place on the kitchen counter that receives direct afternoon sunlight. Coffee’s retail packaging is not usually suitable for long-term storage. Invest in sealed storage jars if possible.

Purchase the appropriate quantity

Almost immediately after roasting, coffee begins to lose freshness. Purchase smaller amounts of freshly roasted coffee on a more regular basis – enough for one or two weeks.

Air exposure is harmful to your beans. If you want to keep your beans in an accessible and/or appealing container, divide your coffee supply into numerous smaller parts, with the larger, unused amount stored in an airtight container.

Because of the increased exposure to oxygen, this is especially crucial when purchasing pre-ground coffee. If you buy whole beans, grind only what you need right before brewing. For further information, please see our roasting guide.

Do you freeze your beans?

Freshness is essential for a good cup of coffee. Coffee should be consumed as soon as possible after it has been roasted, especially if the original packing seal has been broken, according to experts.

While opinions disagree on whether coffee should be frozen or refrigerated, the key consideration is that coffee collects moisture – as well as aromas and flavors – from the air around it due to its hygroscopic nature (bonus vocabulary word for all the coffee geeks out there).

Most home storage containers still allow small amounts of oxygen in, which is why food stored in the freezer for an extended period of time might suffer from freezer burn. As a result, if you do refrigerate or freeze your beans, utilize an airtight container.

If you prefer to freeze your coffee, take only what you need for no more than a week at a time and return the remainder to the freezer before any condensation forms on the frozen coffee.The main brewing procedure is unaffected by freezing your beans.

Seed to Cup

Seed to Cup

From Seed to Cup

The coffee you drink every day has traveled a long distance to reach your cup. Coffee beans go through a standard series of stages to bring out their best between the time they’re grown, picked, and purchased.

1. Gardening

A coffee bean is, in fact, a seed. It is used to make coffee after being dried, roasted, and ground. If the coffee seed is not treated, it can be planted and grown into a coffee tree.

In shaded nurseries, coffee seeds are typically grown in large beds. The seedlings will be watered frequently and kept out of direct sunlight until they are strong enough to be planted permanently. Planting is frequently done during the wet season to keep the soil moist as the roots establish themselves.

2. Getting the Cherries

It will take 3 to 4 years for newly planted coffee trees to develop fruit, depending on the variety. When the coffee cherry is mature and ready to be harvested, it turns a bright, deep red. Every year, there is usually one large harvest. There is a primary and secondary crop in nations such as Colombia, where there are two flowerings per year.

Most countries pick the crop by hand, which is a time-consuming and arduous procedure; but, in places like Brazil, where the environment is relatively flat and the coffee fields are vast, the process has been mechanized. All coffee is harvested in one of two ways, whether by hand or machine:

It will take 3 to 4 years for newly planted coffee trees to develop fruit, depending on the variety. There is a primary and secondary crop in nations such as Colombia. Most countries pick the crop by hand, but in Brazil, the process has become mechanized.

Strip Picked means that all of the cherries are removed from the branch at once, either by machine or by hand.Picked Selectively: Only ripe cherries are plucked, and they are picked individually by hand. Every eight to ten days, pickers rotate among the trees, selecting only the cherries that are at their ripest. Because this type of harvest is more labor consuming and expensive, it is generally employed to harvest the finer Arabica beans.

A good picker will select 100 to 200 pounds of coffee cherries every day, yielding 20 to 40 pounds of coffee beans. Each worker’s daily load is meticulously weighed, and each picker is compensated based on the quality of his or her work. The harvest for the day is then transferred to the processing factory.

The coffee cherry turns red when it is ready to be harvested. Most countries pick the crop by hand, but in Brazil, the process has been mechanized. Each worker’s daily load is meticulously weighed, and each picker is compensated based on the quality of his or her work.

3. The Cherries Are Being Processed

To avoid fruit spoiling, processing must begin as soon as possible after the coffee is gathered. Coffee is processed in one of two ways, depending on location and available resources:

The Dry Way is an age-old method of preparing coffee that is still utilized in many places with limited water resources. The cherries are simply laid out on large surfaces to dry in the sun after being plucked. To keep the cherries from deteriorating, they are raked and turned during the day, then covered at night or during rain to keep them dry. Depending on the weather, this process may take several weeks for each batch of coffee until the moisture level of the cherries reaches 11%.

After harvesting, the Wet Method eliminates the pulp from the coffee cherry, leaving only the parchment skin on the bean. To remove the skin and pulp from the bean, the freshly harvested cherries are first run through a pulping machine.

The beans are then segregated based on weight as they move through water channels. Lighter beans float to the surface, whereas heavier ripe beans sink to the bottom. They are separated by size as they pass through a succession of revolving drums.

The beans are separated and then transported to big, water-filled fermentation tanks. Depending on the state of the beans, the environment, and the altitude, they will stay in these tanks for anywhere from 12 to 48 hours to remove the slippery layer of mucilage (called the parenchyma) that is still connected to the parchment. This layer will disintegrate while resting in the tanks due to naturally occurring enzymes.

When the fermenting process is complete, the beans will feel rough to the touch. The beans are cleaned and ready for drying after passing through additional water channels.

After picking cherries, coffee is processed in one of two ways: Wet or Dry Method. Coffee beans are separated and then transported to big, water-filled fermentation tanks. This removes the slippery layer of mucilage (called the parenchyma) that is still connected to the bean.

4. The Drying of the Beans

If the beans were processed wet, the pulped and fermented beans must now be dried to roughly 11 percent moisture to be safely stored.

These beans, still inside the parchment envelope (the endocarp), can be sun-dried by spreading them on drying tables or floors and turning them frequently, or machine-dried in huge tumblers. The dried beans, known as parchment coffee, are stored in jute or sisal bags until ready for shipment or .further value addition.

5. The Milling of the Beans

Before being shipped, parchment coffee is prepared as follows:

The parchment layer (endocarp) of wet processed coffee is removed by hulling gear. Hulling dry processed coffee refers to removing the complete dried husk of the dried cherries (exocarp, mesocarp, and endocarp).

Polishing is an optional technique that removes any silver skin that remains on the beans after hulling. While polished beans are thought to be superior to unpolished beans, there is little difference between the two.

Grading and sorting are done by size and weight, and beans are also checked for color faults and other flaws.Beans are sized by passing them through a series of filters. They are also pneumatically sorted to distinguish heavy from light beans using an air jet.

The bean size is often indicated on a scale of 10 to 20. The number represents the diameter of a round hole in 1/64ths of an inch. A number 10 bean is about the size of a hole with a diameter of 10/64 of an inch, while a number 15 bean is about the size of a hole with a diameter of 15/64 of an inch.

Finally, faulty beans are removed manually or mechanically. Beans that are unsuitable owing to defects are removed (bad size or color, over-fermented beans, insect-damaged, unhulled). This process is done both by machine and by hand in several places, guaranteeing that only the highest quality coffee beans are exported.

Beans are sized by passing them through a series of filters and are pneumatically sorted to distinguish heavy from light beans using an air jet. Faulty beans are removed manually or mechanically.

6. Exportation of Beans

The milled beans, now known as green coffee, are placed into ships in jute or sisal bags loaded into shipping containers, or bulk-shipped within plastic-lined containers.

7. Coffee Tasting

Coffee is subjected to numerous quality and flavor tests. This procedure is known as cupping, and it is usually performed in a room specifically equipped for the purpose.

First, the taster, sometimes known as the cupper, assesses the beans’ overall visual quality. The beans are then roasted in a small laboratory roaster, quickly ground, and infused in boiling water at a temperature that is precisely controlled. The cupper noses the brew to get a sense of its scent, which is an important stage in determining the quality of the coffee.

After a few minutes of resting, the cupper breaks the crust by pushing the grounds at the top of the cup aside. Before the tasting, the coffee is nosed once more.

The cupper slurps a spoonful of coffee with a fast inhalation to taste it. The goal is to sprinkle the coffee uniformly over the cupper’s taste buds before weighing it on the tongue and spitting it out.

Every day, samples from various batches and types of beans are tasted. Coffees are evaluated not just to detect their features and defects, but also to mix different beans or create the right roast. A professional cupper can taste hundreds of coffee samples per day and still detect minute differences.

Coffee is subjected to numerous quality and flavor tests. Coffees are evaluated not just to detect their features and defects, but also to mix different beans or create the right roast. A professional cupper can taste hundreds of coffee samples per day and still detect minute differences.

8. Coffee Roasting

Roasting turns green coffee into the delicious brown beans we buy in our favorite stores or cafés. Most roasting machines operate at around 550 degrees Fahrenheit. To protect the beans from burning, they are continually moving throughout the process.

When they reach an internal temperature of about 400 degrees Fahrenheit, they start to brown and the caffeol, a fragrant oil held inside the beans, starts to emerge. This process, known as pyrolysis, is crucial to roasting because it generates the flavor and aroma of the coffee we consume.

Following roasting, the beans are quickly chilled by air or water. Roasting is typically done in importing countries since freshly roasted beans must reach consumers as soon as feasible.

The process of roasting coffee beans is crucial because it generates the flavor and aroma of the coffee we consume. Most roasting machines operate at around 550 degrees Fahrenheit to protect the beans from burning. Roasting is typically done in importing countries since beans must reach consumers as soon as feasible.

9. Coffee Grinding

The goal of a good grind is to extract the most taste out of a cup of coffee. The brewing process determines how coarse or fine the coffee is ground.

The appropriate grind grade is determined by the length of time the grounds will be in contact with water. In general, the finer the grind, the faster the coffee should be prepared. As a result, espresso machine coffee is significantly finer ground than drip coffee.

Making Coffee

To learn how to brew coffee, consult our tutorial for tips and techniques on how to produce the perfect cup for any taste. Enjoy!

What is coffee?

What is coffee?

What is coffee?

Everyone knows what a roasted coffee bean looks like, but you might not know what a coffee plant looks like. Coffee trees are cut low to preserve energy and ease in harvesting, but they can grow to heights of more than 30 feet (9 meters). One tree is coated in green, waxy leaves that grow in pairs opposite each other. Along the branches, coffee cherries grow. Because it grows in a continuous cycle, it is not uncommon to see blossoms, green fruit, and ripe fruit all on the same tree.

After the first flowering, it takes roughly a year for a cherry to mature, and it takes around 5 years to reach full fruit output. Coffee plants can live for up to 100 years, but they are most productive between the ages of 7 and 20. Depending on the variety, proper maintenance can preserve and even increase their productivity over time. The average coffee tree yields 10 pounds of coffee cherries per year, which equates to 2 pounds of green beans. All commercially farmed coffee comes from the Coffee Belt region of the world. Rich soil, warm temperatures, frequent rain, and sheltered sun are ideal conditions for tree growth.

Coffee trees can grow to heights of more than 30 feet (9 meters). Coffee plants can live for up to 100 years, but they are most productive between the ages of 7 and 20. The average coffee tree yields 10 pounds of coffee cherries per year, equating to 2 pounds of green beans.

Classification of plants

Coffee’s origins can be traced back to a plant genus known as Coffea. There are roughly 500 genera and 6,000 species of tropical trees and shrubs under the genus. Coffee plant species are thought to number between 25 and 100, according to experts.

Carolus Linneaus, a Swedish botanist, described the genus in the 18th century, along with Coffea Arabica in his Species Plantarum in 1753. Since then, botanists have debated on the precise classification, owing to the enormous diversity of coffee plants. They can range in size from little shrubs to tall trees, with leaves ranging in size from one to 16 inches and colors ranging from purple or yellow to the predominate dark green. Arabica and Robusta are the two most important coffee species in the commercial coffee industry.

Coffee plant species are thought to number between 25 and 100, according to experts. They can range in size ranging from little shrubs to tall trees, with leaves ranging in size from one to 16 inches. There are 6,000 species of tropical trees and shrubs under the genus Coffea. Carolus Linneaus, a Swedish botanist, described the genus in the 18th century.

Arabica Coffea — C. Arabica

Bourbon, Typica, Caturra, Mundo Novo, Tico, San Ramon, Jamaican Blue Mountain are some of the varieties available. Coffea Arabica is a descendant of the first coffee trees found in Ethiopia. These plants produce a fine, mellow, aromatic coffee and account for almost 70% of global coffee production. The beans are flatter and longer than Robusta and have less caffeine.

Arabica coffees command the highest prices on the global market. The best Arabicas are produced at high altitudes, often between 2,000 and 6,000 feet (610 to 1830 meters) above sea level, while optimal altitude varies with proximity to the equator.

 The most crucial criterion is that temperatures remain warm, ideally between 59 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit, with approximately 60 inches of rain per year. Although the trees are hardy, a heavy winter will destroy them. Arabica trees are expensive to produce since the suitable location is hilly and difficult to access. Furthermore, because the trees are more susceptible to disease than Robusta, they necessitate more care and attention.

Coffa Arabica is a descendant of the first coffee trees found in Ethiopia. These plants produce a fine, mellow, aromatic coffee and account for almost 70% of global coffee production. The beans are flatter and longer than Robusta and have less caffeine. Arabica coffees command the highest prices on the global market.

Robusta

The majority of the world’s Robusta is grown in Central and Western Africa, Southeast Asia (including Indonesia and Vietnam), and Brazil. Robusta production is rising while accounting for just approximately 30% of the global market. Robusta is most found in mixes and instant coffees. The Robusta bean is slightly rounder and smaller than the Arabica bean.

Robusta trees are tougher and more resistant to disease and parasites, making cultivation easier and less expensive. It also has the advantage of being tolerant of milder climes, preferring consistent temperatures between 75- and 85-degrees Fahrenheit, allowing it to grow at far lower altitudes than Arabica. It requires approximately 60 inches of rainfall per year and is not frost-resistant. Robusta beans provide a coffee with a distinct flavor and around 50-60% more caffeine than Arabica beans.

Robusta bean is slightly rounder and smaller than the Arabica bean. Robusta beans provide a coffee with a distinct flavor and around 50-60% more caffeine than Arabica beans. It also has the advantage of being tolerant of milder climes and temperatures between 75- to 85-degrees Fahrenheit.

The Coffee Cherry’s Anatomy

The coffee beans you brew are actually the processed and roasted seeds of a fruit known as a coffee cherry. The exocarp is the outer skin of the coffee cherry. The mesocarp, a thin layer of pulp beneath it, is followed by the parenchyma, a slimy layer. The beans themselves are encased in a paper-like envelope known as the endocarp, sometimes known as the parchment.

Inside the parchment, two beans are lined up side by side, each separated by a thin membrane. The actual name for this seed skin is the spermoderm, although it is commonly referred to as the silver skin in the coffee trade.

Coffee beans are the roasted seeds of a coffee cherry. The beans themselves are encased in a paper-like envelope known as the endocarp. The actual name for this seed skin is the spermoderm, although it is commonly referred to as the silver skin.

Image Credit: researchgate.net

There is only one bean inside the cherry in around 5% of the world’s coffee. This is a natural mutation known as a peaberry (also known as a caracol or “snail” in Spanish). Peaberries are occasionally manually sorted for special sale because some people believe they are sweeter and more tasty than normal beans.

 

Coffee Episode: 02 | End

Where did coffee come from?

Where did coffee come from?

Where did coffee come from?

No one knows for certain how or when coffee was found, yet there are numerous legends surrounding its discovery. Coffee grown all over the world may be traced back centuries to the ancient coffee woods of the Ethiopian plateau. Legend has it that the goat herder Kaldi recognized the potential of these treasured beans there.

According to legend, Kaldi discovered coffee after noticing that after consuming the berries from a specific tree, his goats became so energized that they refused to sleep at night. Kaldi reported his findings to the local monastery’s abbot, who concocted a drink from the berries and discovered that it kept him alert throughout the lengthy hours of nightly prayer. The abbot informed the other monks at the monastery about his discovery, and word of the stimulating berries spread. As word spread east and coffee reached the Arabian peninsula, it began a voyage that would take these beans all the way around the world.

Coffee comes from the ancient coffee woods of the Ethiopian plateau. Legend has it that a goat herder discovered the potential of these treasured beans there. As word spread east and coffee reached the Arabian Peninsula, it began a voyage that would take these beans all the way around the world.

Evolution of Coffee Industry

Arabia’s Peninsula

The Arabian Peninsula was the birthplace of coffee cultivation and trading. Coffee was grown in Yemeni Arabia by the 15th century, and by the 16th century, it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey.

Coffee was consumed not just in homes, but also at the many public coffee houses, known as qahveh khaneh, that began to sprout in cities throughout the Near East. People frequented coffee houses for all kinds of social activities, and their popularity was unparalleled.

Customers not only drank coffee and conversed, but they also listened to music, watched entertainers, played chess, and read the news. Coffee houses quickly became such an important hub for information sharing that they were dubbed “Schools of the Wise.”With thousands of visitors from all over the world visiting the holy city of Mecca each year, word of this “wine of Araby” spread.

Coffee was grown in Yemeni Arabia by the 15th century, and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. Coffee houses quickly became such an important hub for information sharing that they were dubbed “Schools of the Wise”.

Coffee Has Arrived in Europe

European visitors to the Near East returned with tales of a unique dark black liquor. Coffee had found its way to Europe by the 17th century and was becoming popular throughout the continent.

Some viewed this new beverage with distrust or terror, dubbing it the “bitter invention of Satan.” When coffee arrived in Venice in 1615, the local church denounced it. The debate was so heated that Pope Clement VIII was summoned to intercede. He decided to taste the beverage before making a decision, and he found it so delicious that he gave it papal permission.

Despite the controversy, coffee shops were soon becoming hubs of social activity and communication in major cities across the United Kingdom, Austria, France, Germany, and Holland. In England, “penny universities” came up, so-called because a cup of coffee and interesting conversation could be had for the price of a penny.

Coffee began to supplant the popular breakfast beverages of the period, beer and wine. Those who drank coffee instead of alcohol started the day alert and energized, and unsurprisingly, the quality of their work improved significantly. (We like to think of this as the forerunner to today’s office coffee service.)

By the mid-17th century, London had over 300 coffee houses, many of which drew like-minded clientele such as businessmen, shippers, brokers, and artists. specialty coffee shops spawned a slew of new businesses. Lloyd’s of London, for example, was founded as Edward Lloyd’s Coffee House.

Coffee arrived in Venice in 1615; the local church denounced it. Pope Clement VIII decided to taste the beverage before deciding. By the mid-17th century, London had over 300 coffee houses. Specialty coffee shops spawned a slew of new businesses.

The Modern Era

Coffee was imported to New Amsterdam, subsequently renamed New York by the British, in the mid-1600s. Though coffee establishments sprouted up quickly, tea remained the preferred beverage in the New World until 1773, when colonists revolted over King George III’s hefty tax on tea. The Boston Tea Party revolution would forever transform the American drinking preference to coffee.

Coffee was first introduced to New York by the British in the 1600s, but tea remained preferred until 1773. The Boston Tea Party revolution led to the end of tea drinking in America.

Plantations Throughout the World

As the beverage’s popularity grew, there was tremendous competition to plant coffee outside of Arabia. In the latter half of the 17th century, the Dutch finally obtained seedlings. Their early attempts to plant them in India were unsuccessful, but they were successful in Batavia, on the island of Java in what is now Indonesia.

The plants thrived, and the Dutch soon had a thriving coffee trade. They then introduced coffee tree cultivation to the Sumatra and Celebes islands. Coffee was brought to Ceylon by the British in the nineteenth century, and by the 1860s, it had become the world’s largest exporter.

Coffee was first introduced to the world by the Dutch in the 17th century, when they planted seedlings on the island of Java in what is now Indonesia. Coffee was brought to Ceylon by the British in the nineteenth century, and by the 1860s, it had become the world’s largest exporter.

Arriving in the Americas

The Mayor of Amsterdam presented King Louis XIV of France with a seedling coffee plant in 1714. It was ordered by the King to be planted in the Royal Botanical Garden in Paris. Gabriel de Clieu, a young naval officer, received a seedling from the King’s plant in 1723. Despite a difficult voyage that included horrible weather, a saboteur who attempted to destroy the seedling, and a pirate raid, he was able to carry it safely to Martinique.

The seedling not only thrived once planted, but it is credited with the spread of over 18 million coffee trees on the island of Martinique during the next 50 years. Even more amazing, this seedling was the progenitor of all coffee trees in the Caribbean, South and Central America.

Francisco de Mello Palheta, who was sent by the emperor to French Guiana to obtain coffee seedlings, is responsible for the legendary Brazilian coffee. The French were unwilling to share, but the French Governor’s wife, taken with his excellent looks, gave him a large bouquet of flowers before he left, burying enough coffee seeds to start what is now a billion-dollar industry.

Coffee seeds were carried to other areas by missionaries and travelers, traders and colonists, and coffee plants were planted all over the world. Plantations were created in beautiful tropical jungles as well as severe mountain altitudes. Some crops thrived, while others went dormant. Coffee economies helped to form new nations. Fortunes have been made and lost. Coffee had become one of the world’s most profitable export crops by the end of the 18th century. Coffee is the most sought-after commodity in the world, second only to crude oil.

Coffee seeds were carried to other areas by missionaries and travelers, traders, and colonists. Plantations were created in beautiful tropical jungles as well as severe mountain altitudes. Coffee had become one of the world’s most profitable export crops by the 18th century.

Coffee Episode 01 | End